Friday, July 22, 2011

TSA Prohibited Items

As A reminder:
The prohibited items list is not intended to be all-inclusive and is updated as necessary. To ensure travelers' security, Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) may determine that an item not on the Prohibited Items List is prohibited.
Sharp Objects
Item
Carry-on
Checked
Box Cutters
No
Yes
Ice Axes/Ice Picks
No
Yes
Knives - except for plastic or round bladed butter knives
No
Yes
Meat Cleavers
No
Yes
Razor-Type Blades - such as box cutters, utility knives, and safety razor blades (disposable razors and their cartridges are permitted)
No
Yes
Sabers
No
Yes
Scissors - metal with pointed tips and blades shorter than four inches
Yes
Yes
Swords - cutting or thrusting weapons, including fencing foils
No
Yes
NOTE: Any sharp objects in checked baggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and inspectors.
Sporting Goods
Item
Carry-on
Checked
Baseball Bats
No
Yes
Bows and Arrows
No
Yes
Cricket Bats
No
Yes
Dumbbells/Hand Weights
No
Yes
Golf Clubs
No
Yes
Hockey Sticks
No
Yes
Lacrosse Sticks
No
Yes
Pool Cues
No
Yes
Ski Poles
No
Yes
Spear Guns
No
Yes

Guns & Firearms
Item
Carry-on
Checked
Ammunition - Check with your airline or travel agent to see if ammunition is permitted in checked baggage on the airline you are flying. If ammunition is permitted, it must be declared to the airline at check-in. Small arms ammunitions for personal use must be securely packed in fiber, wood or metal boxes or other packaging specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition. Ask about limitations or fees, if any, that apply.
No
Yes
BB guns
No
Yes
Compressed Air Guns (to include paintball markers) - Carried in checked luggage without compressed air cylinder attached.
No
Yes
Firearms - firearms carried as checked baggage MUST be unloaded, packed in a locked hard-sided container, and declared to the airline at check-in. 
No
Yes
Flare Guns - May be carried as checked baggage MUST be unloaded, packed in a locked hard-sided container, and declared to the airline at check-in. 
No
Yes
Flares
No
No
Gun Lighters*
No
Yes
Gun Powder including black powder and percussion caps
No
No
Parts of Guns and Firearms
No
Yes
Pellet Guns
No
Yes
Realistic Replicas of Firearms
No
Yes
Starter Pistols - can only be carried as checked baggage and MUST be unloaded, packed in a locked hard-sided container, and declared to the airline at check-in. 
No
Yes
NOTE: Check with your airline or travel agent to see if firearms are permitted in checked baggage on the airline you are flying. Ask about limitations or fees, if any, that apply.
*Permitted in checked baggage only if it does not contain lighter fluid.
Tools
Item
Carry-on
Checked
Axes and Hatchets
No
Yes
Cattle Prods
No
Yes
Crowbars
No
Yes
Hammers
No
Yes
Drills and drill bits (including cordless portable power drills)
No
Yes
Saws (including cordless portable power saws)
No
Yes
Tools (greater than seven inches in length)
No
Yes
Tools (seven inches or less in length)
Yes
Yes
Screwdrivers (seven inches or less in length)
Yes
Yes
Wrenches and Pliers (seven inches or less in length)
Yes
Yes
NOTE: Any sharp objects in checked baggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and Security Officers.
Martial Arts & Self Defense Items
Item
Carry-on
Checked
Billy Clubs
No
Yes
Black Jacks
No
Yes
Brass Knuckles
No
Yes
Kubatons
No
Yes
Self Defense Sprays - One 4 ounce (118ml) container of mace or pepper spray is permitted in checked baggage provided it is equipped with a safety mechanism to prevent accidental discharge. Self Defense Sprays containing more than 2% by mass of Tear Gas (CS or CN) are prohibited in Checked Baggage. For more information visit www.faa.gov., click on Passengers, then Preparing to Fly.
No
Yes
Martial Arts Weapons
No
Yes
Night Sticks
No
Yes
Nunchakus
No
Yes
Stun Guns/Shocking Devices
No
Yes
Throwing Stars
No
Yes
NOTE: Any sharp objects in checked baggage should be sheathed or securely wrapped to prevent injury to baggage handlers and Security Officers.
Explosive & Flammable Materials, Disabling Chemicals & Other Dangerous Items
Explosive Materials
Carry-on
Checked
Blasting Caps
No
No
Dynamite
No
No
Fireworks
No
No
Flares (in any form)
No
No
Hand Grenades
No
No
Plastic Explosives
No
No
Realistic Replicas of Explosives
No
No
Flammable Items
Carry-on
Checked
Aerosol (any except for personal care or toiletries in limited quantities)
No
No
Fuels (including cooking fuels and any flammable liquid fuel)
No
No
Gasoline
No
No
Gas Torches
No
No
Lighter Fluid
No
No
Common Lighters - Lighters without fuel are permitted in checked baggage. Lighters with fuel are prohibited in checked baggage, unless they adhere to the Department of Transportation (DOT) exemption, which allows up to two fueled lighters if properly enclosed in a DOT approved case. If you are uncertain as to whether your lighter is prohibited, please leave it at home.
Yes
No
Torch Lighters - Torch lighters create a thin, needle-like flame that is hotter (reaching 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit) and more intense than those from common lighters. Torch lighters are often used for pipes and cigars, and maintain a consistent stream of air-propelled fire regardless of the angle at which it is held. Torch lighters continue to be banned.
No
No
Strike-anywhere Matches - One book of safety (non-strike anywhere) matches are permitted as carry-on items, but all matches are prohibited in checked baggage.
No
No
Flammable Paints (See Other Items below for non-flammable paints)
No
No
Turpentine and Paint Thinner
No
No
Realistic Replicas of Incendiaries
No
No
NOTE: There are other hazardous materials that are regulated by the FAA. This information is summarized at www.faa.gov, click on Passengers, then Preparing to Fly.
Disabling Chemicals & Other Dangerous Items
Carry-on
Checked
Chlorine for Pools and Spas
No
No
Small compressed gas cartridges
(Up to 2 in life vests and 2 spares. The spares must accompany the life vests and presented as one unit)
Yes
Yes
Fire extinguishers and other compressed gas cylinders
No
No
Liquid Bleach
No
No
Spillable Batteries - except those in wheelchairs
No
No
Spray Paint
No
No
Tear Gas - Self Defense Sprays containing more than 2% by mass of Tear Gas (CS or CN).
No
No
Vehicle Airbags
No
No
NOTE: There are other hazardous materials that are regulated by the FAA. This information is summarized at www.faa.gov.
Other Items
Item
Carry-on
Checked
Gel-type candles
No
Yes
Gel shoe inserts - Gel shoe inserts are not permitted, but shoes constructed with gel heels are allowed and must be removed and screened.
No
Yes
Non-flammable liquid, gel, or aerosol paint
Yes - 3.4 ounces (100ml) or smaller container
Yes
Flammable liquid, gel, or aerosol paint
No
No
Snow globes and like decorations regardless of size or amount of liquid inside, even with documentation.
No
Yes

Monday, July 18, 2011

Who's Job is Safety?

When flying safety isn't just the job of the FAA, the pilot's or the flight attendants.  Each of us needs to do our part. Each of us needs to think about safety.
Below are some tips to follow to keep you and your fellow travelers safe when you fly. Each of us must pay attention to the flight and cabin crews. They are there to keep you as safe as possible.
Each of us can make our flights even safer by following some guidelines:
·      *Pay attention to the flight attendant safety briefing at the beginning of your flight and read the safety briefing card.
·      *Check out the safety procedures posted in the seat backs.
·      *Buckle up. Keep you and your family safe by wearing a seat belt at all times while seated.
·      *Bring things along to occupy the time of your children. A happy child makes a happy parent and an upset child makes an upset parent.
·     *Use an approved child safety seat or device if your child weighs less than 40 pounds.
·     *Prevent in-flight injuries by following your airline's carry-on restrictions.
·     *When it's time, turn off your personal electronic device (PED).

Friday, July 15, 2011

Turbulence: Staying Safe

Turbulence: Staying Safe
What is Turbulence?

Turbulence is air movement that normally cannot be seen and often occurs unexpectedly. It can be created by many different conditions, including atmospheric pressure, jet streams, air around mountains, cold or warm weather fronts or thunderstorms. Turbulence can even occur when the sky appears to be clear.
While turbulence is normal and happens often, it can be dangerous. Its bumpy ride can cause passengers who are not wearing their seat belts to be thrown from their seats without warning. But, by following the guidelines suggested on this site, you can help keep yourself and your loved ones safe when traveling by air.
To keep you and your family as safe as possible during flight, FAA regulations require passengers to be seated with their seat belts fastened:
·       *  When the airplane leaves the gate and as it climbs after take-off.
·       *During landing and taxi.
·       *Whenever the seat belt sign is illuminated during flight.

Why is it important to follow these safety regulations? Consider this:
·     In nonfatal accidents, in-flight turbulence is the leading cause of injuries to airline passengers and flight attendants.
·      * Each year, approximately 58 people in the United States are injured by turbulence while not wearing their seat belts.
·      * From 1980 through 2008, U.S. air carriers had 234 turbulence accidents*, resulting in 298 serious injuries and three       fatalities.
·      * Of the 298 serious injuries, 184 involved flight attendants and 114 involved passengers.
·      * At least two of the three fatalities involved passengers who were not wearing their seat belts while the seat belt sign was illuminated.
·     *  Generally, two-thirds of turbulence-related accidents occur at or above 30,000 feet.